Posts tagged Drones

darklyeuphoric:

*Gadzooks.
Drone camera photo by Anthony Bourdain on Twitter

darklyeuphoric:

*Gadzooks.

Drone camera photo by Anthony Bourdain on Twitter


The drone turns out to belong to one Adam Eidinger—or at least, it used to. And Eidinger is very disappointed about his loss. Eidinger, who has been tweeting the matter, tells me that he uses his drone to take aerial videos of Washington D.C., most of which you can find on his YouTube channel. Here’s a sample:
Last Friday, Eidinger informed me that he wanted to take a short video of a festival in Adams Morgan, and was flying his quadcopter from a rooftop on 18th Street NW. A huge gust of wind blew it too far south and Eidinger quickly lost orientation. The copter was almost 5,000 feet away from him, and he couldn’t tell which way was forward and which way was backward. When his remote loses contact with the drone, says Eidinger, the copter is programmed to slowly descend on its own—a “safe landing mode,” which prevents it from simply falling out of the sky and crashing. So it’s possible that the quadcopter is sitting on a rooftop somewhere in the area—maybe even on your rooftop (have you checked?). Eidinger doesn’t think it has fallen in a public place, because he says he canvassed the whole area and had no luck.

(via Lawfare › Drone Lost in Skies Over Washington D.C. Neighborhood)

The drone turns out to belong to one Adam Eidinger—or at least, it used to. And Eidinger is very disappointed about his loss. Eidinger, who has been tweeting the matter, tells me that he uses his drone to take aerial videos of Washington D.C., most of which you can find on his YouTube channel. Here’s a sample:

Last Friday, Eidinger informed me that he wanted to take a short video of a festival in Adams Morgan, and was flying his quadcopter from a rooftop on 18th Street NW. A huge gust of wind blew it too far south and Eidinger quickly lost orientation. The copter was almost 5,000 feet away from him, and he couldn’t tell which way was forward and which way was backward. When his remote loses contact with the drone, says Eidinger, the copter is programmed to slowly descend on its own—a “safe landing mode,” which prevents it from simply falling out of the sky and crashing. So it’s possible that the quadcopter is sitting on a rooftop somewhere in the area—maybe even on your rooftop (have you checked?). Eidinger doesn’t think it has fallen in a public place, because he says he canvassed the whole area and had no luck.

(via Lawfare › Drone Lost in Skies Over Washington D.C. Neighborhood)

new-aesthetic:

Lost AR drone (by nicolasnova)

new-aesthetic:

Lost AR drone (by nicolasnova)

Surveillance drone industry plans PR effort to counter negative image | UK news | The Guardian

The Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems Association (UAVSA), a trade group that represents the drone industry to the UK government, has recommended drones deployed in Britain should be shown to “benefit mankind in general”, be decorated with humanitarian-related advertisements, and be painted bright colours to distance them from those used in warzones.


An Iranian company Aaye Art Group (“designer and manufacturer of artistic and cultural goods”) is making replicas of the American RQ-170 drone aircraft downed in Iran last month:  ”Most of the toys, which come in several colors and are  made of Iranian plastic, have already been snapped up by Iranian  government organizations. […] The firm is now making 2,000 of them a  day. ”  

(Washington Post)
(Advertising Lab: Spy Plane As Propaganda Tchotchke)

An Iranian company Aaye Art Group (“designer and manufacturer of artistic and cultural goods”) is making replicas of the American RQ-170 drone aircraft downed in Iran last month:  ”Most of the toys, which come in several colors and are made of Iranian plastic, have already been snapped up by Iranian government organizations. […] The firm is now making 2,000 of them a day. ”  

(Washington Post)

(Advertising Lab: Spy Plane As Propaganda Tchotchke)

Why drones aren't game-changers - U.S. Military - Salon.com

An analysis of official Air Force data conducted by TomDispatch indicates that its drones crashed in spectacular fashion no less than 13 times in 2011, including that May 5th crash in Kandahar. … All but two of the incidents involved the MQ-1 [Predator] model….

In 2010, there were seven major drone mishaps, all but one involving Predators; in 2009, there were 11.

In other words, there have been 31 drone losses in three years, none apparently shot down, all diving into the planet of their own mechanical accord or thanks to human error.

For the First Time, Predator Drones Participate in Civilian Arrests on U.S. Soil | Popular Science

A somewhat strange story emerged yesterday involving an extremist antigovernment group, a North Dakota sheriff’s office, and six missing cows, but there’s a much larger story behind this brief legal tangle between local law enforcement and the Brossart family of Nelson Country. When Alex, Thomas and Jacob Brossart were arrested on their farm back in June after allegedly chasing the local Sheriff off their property with rifles, they became the first known U.S. citizens to be arrested on American soil with the help of a Predator drone, Stars and Stripes reports.

Just as powerful as Iran trumpeting the image of a captured American drone this week is the fact that Noor Behram’s photo-documentation of U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan, the subject of a current exhibition in London, appears in Wired nearly in the same news cycle.

So much for invisibility — and disconnect.

More: Drones, and Civilians, in the Light

Attack of the Drones: Taiwan’s future military (by NMAWorldEdition)

Fascinating.

Wired had a good story a while ago about the company that does these videos, here.

Exclusive: Computer Virus Hits U.S. Drone Fleet | Danger Room | Wired.com

A computer virus has infected the cockpits of America’s Predator and Reaper drones, logging pilots’ every keystroke as they remotely fly missions over Afghanistan and other warzones.

The virus, first detected nearly two weeks ago by the military’s Host-Based Security System, has not prevented pilots at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada from flying their missions overseas. Nor have there been any confirmed incidents of classified information being lost or sent to an outside source.

But the virus has resisted multiple efforts to remove it from Creech’s computers, network security specialists say. And the infection underscores the ongoing security risks in what has become the U.S. military’s most important weapons system. “We keep wiping it off, and it keeps coming back,” says a source familiar with the network infection, one of three that told Danger Room about the virus.

“We think it’s benign. But we just don’t know.”

Army Tracking Plan: Drones That Never Forget a Face | Danger Room | Wired.com:
“Long Range,  Non-cooperative, Biometric Tagging, Tracking  and Location” system, and “Adversary Behavior Acquisition, Collection, Understanding, and Summarization (ABACUS)” tool, explained.

Army Tracking Plan: Drones That Never Forget a Face | Danger Room | Wired.com:

“Long Range, Non-cooperative, Biometric Tagging, Tracking and Location” system, and “Adversary Behavior Acquisition, Collection, Understanding, and Summarization (ABACUS)” tool, explained.

A blueprint for the inevitable future of warfare: when time is critical and running decisions up the chain isn’t feasible, software will make key decisions about what constitutes a target, what falls within the bounds of the “rules of war,” and whether or not it’s safe to commence firing. If a program can satisfy whatever requirements have been seeded in its coding, then it’s bombs away.

Rhizome | Drone Ethnography

All of us that use the internet are already practicing Drone Ethnography. Look at the features of drone technology: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Surveillance, Sousveillance. Networks of collected information, over land and in the sky.

Now consider the “consumer” side of tech: mapping programs, location-aware pocket tech, public-sourced media databases, and the apps and algorithms by which we navigate these tools. We already study the world the way a drone sees it: from above, with a dozen unblinking eyes, recording everything with the cold indecision of algorithmic commands honed over time, affecting nothing—except, perhaps, a single, momentary touch, the momentary awareness and synchronicity of a piece of information discovered at precisely the right time.