Posts tagged Objects

procrastinaut:

The objects devised by Dan Grayber have essentially one function: “to sustain themselves.”

Many of my pieces are small, spring loaded, mechanical objects.  They are intricately designed and fabricated to accomplish one of the most simple, yet most essential tasks that an autonomous object can.  This task, this need, is that of holding itself up.  In most cases, my pieces accomplish this by actively attaching themselves to specific architectural features and individual objects.

His show “Formalities" is up in Oakland right now, the opening reception is October 4.
More at BLDGBLOG: Tensioned Suspension, and at Wired.

procrastinaut:

The objects devised by Dan Grayber have essentially one function: “to sustain themselves.”

Many of my pieces are small, spring loaded, mechanical objects.  They are intricately designed and fabricated to accomplish one of the most simple, yet most essential tasks that an autonomous object can.  This task, this need, is that of holding itself up.  In most cases, my pieces accomplish this by actively attaching themselves to specific architectural features and individual objects.

His show “Formalities" is up in Oakland right now, the opening reception is October 4.

More at BLDGBLOG: Tensioned Suspension, and at Wired.

A brief but delightful essay draws attention to an overlooked material-culture icon: The cardboard cutout. I could go on about this at length … now that someone has brought it to my attention…. 

The cardboard cutout was drafted into law enforcement this summer, when a lifesize version of a local cop was propped up near the bikes at the Alewife T Station in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Perhaps more surprising than even the cutout’s production and deployment was its apparent effectiveness: bike thefts dropped measurably.
“I was actually a little startled by it when I first saw it,” Silen told WBZ-TV. “Last month, just one bike was stolen at Alewife, compared to the five stolen in July of last year. —Officer David Silen
The effectiveness of the cutout is no doubt aided by the dim lighting, and the almost-active nature of the pose selected. Early days yet, but worth considering whether a cardboard cutout might be more of a deterrent than our tech-mediated surveillance surround? Not to mention, cheaper…

 Please, read the rest: Cut It Out | HiLobrow

A brief but delightful essay draws attention to an overlooked material-culture icon: The cardboard cutout. I could go on about this at length … now that someone has brought it to my attention….

The cardboard cutout was drafted into law enforcement this summer, when a lifesize version of a local cop was propped up near the bikes at the Alewife T Station in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Perhaps more surprising than even the cutout’s production and deployment was its apparent effectiveness: bike thefts dropped measurably.

“I was actually a little startled by it when I first saw it,” Silen told WBZ-TV. “Last month, just one bike was stolen at Alewife, compared to the five stolen in July of last year. —Officer David Silen

The effectiveness of the cutout is no doubt aided by the dim lighting, and the almost-active nature of the pose selected. Early days yet, but worth considering whether a cardboard cutout might be more of a deterrent than our tech-mediated surveillance surround? Not to mention, cheaper…

 Please, read the rest: Cut It Out | HiLobrow


Between educational props and memorabilia, this series of objects visualises and celebrates the abstract bestiary of the internet and acts as a tangible starting point to discuss our relationship to IT technology.

(via David Benque: Specimens of IT Fauna)
Pictured: “Web Crawler – 200×100×40mm.”

Between educational props and memorabilia, this series of objects visualises and celebrates the abstract bestiary of the internet and acts as a tangible starting point to discuss our relationship to IT technology.

(via David Benque: Specimens of IT Fauna)

Pictured: “Web Crawler – 200×100×40mm.”

thejogging:

revenge, 2013
nail in hammer
•••

thejogging:

revenge, 2013

nail in hammer

•••

thingsmagazine:

Milton Berle’s Joke File
unconsumption:

What do you do with expired or otherwise unwanted credit cards?
Kristal Romano turns them into wearable art.

unconsumption:

What do you do with expired or otherwise unwanted credit cards?

Kristal Romano turns them into wearable art.

thejogging:

wrong way, 2013
digital photograph
•••

thejogging:

wrong way, 2013

digital photograph

•••

artfoodie:

Robin Antar: The woman who makes me wish food were made out of stone… instead of edible perishable ingredients…

her realistic food sculptures in stone merge traditional techniques with contemporary imagery… its awesome…

artfoodie:

Robin Antar: The woman who makes me wish food were made out of stone… instead of edible perishable ingredients…

her realistic food sculptures in stone merge traditional techniques with contemporary imagery… its awesome…

thingsmagazine:

Chopcycle riders, from the Bruce Pascal Collection of Rare, Unusual and Prototype Hotwheels

junkculture:

Everyday rubbish fabricated entirely from paper

significobs:



Untitled Project: ANY THING YOU WANT  is a fascinating new undertaking from friend of Significant Objects Conrad Bakker. 
 
Bakker has made hand-carved versions of a variety of objects and products — see his site — and that practice continues here with an interesting twist: He will make a hand-carved version of something you used to own: 
 

The world is filled with things. Things that are made, things that are bought and sold, things that are collected and displayed, things that are hidden or lost, things that will all eventually disappear. 
 
These things reveal themselves to us through their uses and their physical matter, but also through their absences. Consider that pocketknife lost while camping, that coveted designer handbag that was never purchased, the classic rock album thrown away by a careless parent, or that dog-eared copy of Walden that was lent to a friend who has yet to give it back. These unavailable things have the capacity to generate a provocative negative space in our daily lives that can slowly turn into a demanding absence. 
 
Untitled Project: ANY THING YOU WANT is designed to help fill your empty space of longing with a real, hand-carved and painted sculpture, a tangible simulation of that specific thing you want. This simulated thing will stand in for and point to the very thing you want even as it foregrounds the absence of the real thing. This project is positioned somewhere between a custom carved/painted sculpture-to-order service and a surrogate replacement agency for lost or missing things. In every way, Untitled Project: ANY THING YOU WANT provides us with an extended opportunity to think about things.




More here: Untitled Project: ANY THING YOU WANT (pdf) 
And/or here: UNTITLED PROJECT: ANY THING YOU WANT

significobs:

Untitled Project: ANY THING YOU WANT  is a fascinating new undertaking from friend of Significant Objects Conrad Bakker.

 

Bakker has made hand-carved versions of a variety of objects and products — see his site — and that practice continues here with an interesting twist: He will make a hand-carved version of something you used to own:

 

The world is filled with things. Things that are made, things that are bought and sold, things that are collected and displayed, things that are hidden or lost, things that will all eventually disappear.

 

These things reveal themselves to us through their uses and their physical matter, but also through their absences. Consider that pocketknife lost while camping, that coveted designer handbag that was never purchased, the classic rock album thrown away by a careless parent, or that dog-eared copy of Walden that was lent to a friend who has yet to give it back. These unavailable things have the capacity to generate a provocative negative space in our daily lives that can slowly turn into a demanding absence. 

 

Untitled Project: ANY THING YOU WANT is designed to help fill your empty space of longing with a real, hand-carved and painted sculpture, a tangible simulation of that specific thing you want. This simulated thing will stand in for and point to the very thing you want even as it foregrounds the absence of the real thing. This project is positioned somewhere between a custom carved/painted sculpture-to-order service and a surrogate replacement agency for lost or missing things. In every way, Untitled Project: ANY THING YOU WANT provides us with an extended opportunity to think about things.

And/or here: UNTITLED PROJECT: ANY THING YOU WANT

rhizomedotorg:

George Maciunas “Flux Smile Machine” c 1970
A gag that forces you to smile, or rather to makes an awful grimace, “making it an atavistic and threatening gesture directed against bourgeois society.”

rhizomedotorg:

George Maciunas “Flux Smile Machine” c 1970

A gag that forces you to smile, or rather to makes an awful grimace, “making it an atavistic and threatening gesture directed against bourgeois society.”

significobs:




A two-legged stool, a lamp on a pole that turns on when lifted, a broom with two handles and a brush with very long hair. The objects made by Köppen have recognizable parts but their function is unknown.
“By ridding objects of a predetermined ‘perfect’ function, we can be free to discover them and rediscover ourselves in the process. … I have sought a way for individuals to start afresh and redefine themselves by reshaping the things around them.”


(via Learn to Unlearn by Lina-Marie Köppen)

significobs:

A two-legged stool, a lamp on a pole that turns on when lifted, a broom with two handles and a brush with very long hair. The objects made by Köppen have recognizable parts but their function is unknown.

“By ridding objects of a predetermined ‘perfect’ function, we can be free to discover them and rediscover ourselves in the process. … I have sought a way for individuals to start afresh and redefine themselves by reshaping the things around them.”

(via Learn to Unlearn by Lina-Marie Köppen)

significobs:


Royal College of Art student Gabriele Meldaikyte has designed a set of interactive exhibits for a museum of iPhone gestures
“There are five multi-touch gestures forming the language we use between our fingers and iPhone screens,” says Meldaikyte. “This is the way we communicate, navigate and give commands to our iPhones.”
She used wood and acrylic to make five 3D objects that recreate the physical actions required to operate a touch-screen smartphone, using newspaper clippings, book pages and paper maps to represent the data being manipulated.

(via Multi-Touch iPhone Gestures by Gabriele Meldaikyte)

significobs:

Royal College of Art student Gabriele Meldaikyte has designed a set of interactive exhibits for a museum of iPhone gestures

“There are five multi-touch gestures forming the language we use between our fingers and iPhone screens,” says Meldaikyte. “This is the way we communicate, navigate and give commands to our iPhones.”

She used wood and acrylic to make five 3D objects that recreate the physical actions required to operate a touch-screen smartphone, using newspaper clippings, book pages and paper maps to represent the data being manipulated.

(via Multi-Touch iPhone Gestures by Gabriele Meldaikyte)