Posts tagged Photography

procrastinaut:

What’s it like inside the Motorola factory in Fort Worth? We got totally non-exclusive access, and present our uniquely haunting findings, here:
Come take a tour of Motorola’s spooky, vacant Moto X factory - Yahoo News

procrastinaut:

What’s it like inside the Motorola factory in Fort Worth? We got totally non-exclusive access, and present our uniquely haunting findings, here:

Come take a tour of Motorola’s spooky, vacant Moto X factory - Yahoo News

procrastinaut:

Instagram User Mrpimpgoodgame Takes Tons of Identical Selfies
Pretty good, actually. Somebody give this guy a gallery show.
Meanwhile follow him on Instagram here  if you wish. (You pretty much know what you’re getting!)

The more I look at this, the more I love it. He should get a grant.

procrastinaut:

Instagram User Mrpimpgoodgame Takes Tons of Identical Selfies

Pretty good, actually. Somebody give this guy a gallery show.

Meanwhile follow him on Instagram here  if you wish. (You pretty much know what you’re getting!)

The more I look at this, the more I love it. He should get a grant.

Analyzed: The Disconnect Between Before and After the Bombing Starts — BagNews
procrastinaut:

This is fairly awesome: There is a “subculture” of hyper-decorated “Decorata” big rigs in Japan. Photographer Tatsuki Masaru has made a book of photographs about it.
More here: The Subculture of Japanese Trucker Art | Messy Nessy Chic Messy Nessy Chic. Via OBlog.

procrastinaut:

This is fairly awesome: There is a “subculture” of hyper-decorated “Decorata” big rigs in Japan. Photographer Tatsuki Masaru has made a book of photographs about it.

More here: The Subculture of Japanese Trucker Art | Messy Nessy Chic Messy Nessy Chic. Via OBlog.

natgeofound:

Women enjoy the benefits of a heated whirlpool in Saint Petersburg, Florida, 1973.Photograph by Jonathan Blair, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Women enjoy the benefits of a heated whirlpool in Saint Petersburg, Florida, 1973.Photograph by Jonathan Blair, National Geographic

Is there such a thing as too much of the self?
(via Striped Photographs Created Entirely In-Camera by Painting the Set)
Weilun Chong: Photographs of commuters in Singapore and Hong Kong in his series, “Please Mind the Gap.”: 


Weilun Chong came upon the idea for his series, “Please Mind the Gap,” when he ignored that very reminder and nearly lost his cellphone in the space between the train and the platform in Singapore’s metro system. 




Chong, an advertising art director and photographer on the side, became hooked on the idea of capturing unique moments in that small, significant space between places. For the next three years, he photographed “almost religiously” on his daily commute to work and on weekends.

Weilun Chong: Photographs of commuters in Singapore and Hong Kong in his series, “Please Mind the Gap.”:

Weilun Chong came upon the idea for his series, “Please Mind the Gap,” when he ignored that very reminder and nearly lost his cellphone in the space between the train and the platform in Singapore’s metro system. 

Chong, an advertising art director and photographer on the side, became hooked on the idea of capturing unique moments in that small, significant space between places. For the next three years, he photographed “almost religiously” on his daily commute to work and on weekends.

thejogging:

Rineke-ing, 2013
InstaCollage ≤ø≥≤ø≥

thejogging:

Rineke-ing, 2013

InstaCollage 

≤ø≥≤ø≥

Destroy all cell phones by ekai on Flickr.

His superthin tripod does seem to have attracted the attention of the mom on the left, but no one else. They’re looking at each other as he shoots. His blue T-shirt says elgooG.

(via greg.org: the making of: movies, art, &c., by greg allen)

His superthin tripod does seem to have attracted the attention of the mom on the left, but no one else. They’re looking at each other as he shoots. His blue T-shirt says elgooG.

(via greg.org: the making of: movies, art, &c., by greg allen)

(via Still Life Photos that Combine Stark White Scenes with Just a Touch of Color)

Kevin Barton, who spent the last several years acquiring prints by mid-century commercial portrait photographer Norman Schroth, amassing nearly all of Scroth’s oeuvre — nearly 12,000 images — from eBay and sorting them by age, gender and physical likeness. Barton then piled several negatives of similar faces and poses to create four fictitious portraits that obscure myriad characteristics into a single, idealistic “central type” common in the 1940s and 50s. The black and white prints are frenetic, ghostly reminders of a society’s effort to mainstream identity into normative roles of the nuclear family.

(via Beyond Two Dimensions: Installing Photography)

Kevin Barton, who spent the last several years acquiring prints by mid-century commercial portrait photographer Norman Schroth, amassing nearly all of Scroth’s oeuvre — nearly 12,000 images — from eBay and sorting them by age, gender and physical likeness. Barton then piled several negatives of similar faces and poses to create four fictitious portraits that obscure myriad characteristics into a single, idealistic “central type” common in the 1940s and 50s. The black and white prints are frenetic, ghostly reminders of a society’s effort to mainstream identity into normative roles of the nuclear family.

(via Beyond Two Dimensions: Installing Photography)

"If you take a selfie outside our mirrored window, expect to be photographed. "
Reddit / If you take a selfie outside our mirrored window, expect to be photographed. - Imgur

"If you take a selfie outside our mirrored window, expect to be photographed. "

Reddit / If you take a selfie outside our mirrored window, expect to be photographed. - Imgur


One of the examples Newsnight’s Stephen Smith uses to illustrate the point is this viral comparison photo from earlier this year. At the top we have the view at the Vatican as people bid farewell to Pope John Paul II in 2005, and at the bottom the same ceremony for Pope Benedict XVI in 2013. Which crowd do you think remembers their experience best?

via Is Smartphone Photography Killing Our Memories and Experiences?)

One of the examples Newsnight’s Stephen Smith uses to illustrate the point is this viral comparison photo from earlier this year. At the top we have the view at the Vatican as people bid farewell to Pope John Paul II in 2005, and at the bottom the same ceremony for Pope Benedict XVI in 2013. Which crowd do you think remembers their experience best?

via Is Smartphone Photography Killing Our Memories and Experiences?)