Posts tagged Robots

procrastinaut:

A short, fascinating piece on Pacific Standard addresses “sign spinning" — a profession (which consists of exactly what it sounds like) that arose during the recession — and has swiftly been wiped out by mechanical sign spinners.

Author Lisa Wade notes that the human sign spinners she’d seen tended to be black or Latino men. The robot versions, however, tend to be white women. Google Image searches support her anecdotal observation.

(Wade mentions that NPR has addressed the robot sign-spinners, but didn’t seem to pick  up on the race/gender difference from the humans they’re replacing. On the other hand, NPR has an actual academic speculating that these machines “may become actual robots — able to see us, guess our age and gender and customize their marketing messages with frightening accuracy.”)

Above is an online commercial for mechanical sign-spinners — “The Future of Sign Spinning.”

More: The Curious Evolution of the Sign Spinner

Via ArtsJournal.

I’m super excited to get this piece out. I’ve known Kal and enjoyed his work for a very long time. Please give it a look, if you will. The guy is a true original. 
procrastinaut:

Transcendental Mechanization? Bot and Souled?
How one artist exploring whether technology can do “spiritual work.”

This brings us to Kal Spelletich’s current work in progress — praying robots. These are anthropomorphic (although explicitly mechanical) objects outfitted with an array of sensors that aim to detect the viewer’s “aura.” Spelletich is a bit secretive about the details, but mentions hacked versions of sensors measuring temperature, light, pulse, humidity and so on, as well as revised and recombined versions of technologies such as lie detectors and EKG machines.
Based on what it picks up from the viewer, the machine will perform one of several “gestures” — kneeling, hand clasping, genuflecting. The physical execution, Spelletich says, will range from humorous to solemn. As a final detail, he has outfitted the robots in human clothing he has gathered from individuals who have influenced his life over the years.

More:  Why one provocative artist built ‘praying robots’ for his newest installation - Yahoo News

I’m super excited to get this piece out. I’ve known Kal and enjoyed his work for a very long time. Please give it a look, if you will. The guy is a true original.

procrastinaut:

Transcendental Mechanization? Bot and Souled?

How one artist exploring whether technology can do “spiritual work.”

This brings us to Kal Spelletich’s current work in progress — praying robots. These are anthropomorphic (although explicitly mechanical) objects outfitted with an array of sensors that aim to detect the viewer’s “aura.” Spelletich is a bit secretive about the details, but mentions hacked versions of sensors measuring temperature, light, pulse, humidity and so on, as well as revised and recombined versions of technologies such as lie detectors and EKG machines.

Based on what it picks up from the viewer, the machine will perform one of several “gestures” — kneeling, hand clasping, genuflecting. The physical execution, Spelletich says, will range from humorous to solemn. As a final detail, he has outfitted the robots in human clothing he has gathered from individuals who have influenced his life over the years.

More:  Why one provocative artist built ‘praying robots’ for his newest installation - Yahoo News

2020:

At a factory here in the Dutch countryside, 128 robot arms work with yoga-like flexibility. Video cameras guide them through feats well beyond the capability of the most dexterous human.
One robot arm endlessly forms three perfect bends in two connector wires and slips them into holes almost too small for the eye to see. The arms work so fast that they must be enclosed in glass cages to prevent the people supervising them from being injured. And they do it all without a coffee break — three shifts a day, 365 days a year.

This is the future. A new wave of robots, far more adept than those now commonly used by automakers and other heavy manufacturers, are replacing workers around the world in both manufacturing and distribution.

2020:

At a factory here in the Dutch countryside, 128 robot arms work with yoga-like flexibility. Video cameras guide them through feats well beyond the capability of the most dexterous human.

One robot arm endlessly forms three perfect bends in two connector wires and slips them into holes almost too small for the eye to see. The arms work so fast that they must be enclosed in glass cages to prevent the people supervising them from being injured. And they do it all without a coffee break — three shifts a day, 365 days a year.

This is the future. A new wave of robots, far more adept than those now commonly used by automakers and other heavy manufacturers, are replacing workers around the world in both manufacturing and distribution.

Robot readable world (by Timo)

How do robots see the world? How do they gather meaning from our streets, cities, media and from us?

This is an experiment in found machine-vision footage, exploring the aesthetics of the robot eye.

A blueprint for the inevitable future of warfare: when time is critical and running decisions up the chain isn’t feasible, software will make key decisions about what constitutes a target, what falls within the bounds of the “rules of war,” and whether or not it’s safe to commence firing. If a program can satisfy whatever requirements have been seeded in its coding, then it’s bombs away.
In Alone Together, I talk about our having reached a “robotic moment.” This is not because we have robots who are capable of loving us, but because so many of the people I interviewed say that they are prepared to be loved by a robot.

Robot makes painting based on response to audio inputs.

The painting is rather poor.

(via My Robot Could Paint That | Videogum)


Diego Trujillo-Pisanty, currently a student in the Design Interactions department at the Royal College of Art in London, has looked ahead at how future homes might be redesigned to accommodate domestic robots. Rather than build entire new forms of architecture, however, Diego suggests that we’ll first begin quite simply: retrofitting our interior environments, in often deceptively small ways, for optical navigation by autonomous mobile home systems.
This will primarily take the form of peripheral additions to everyday objects, as well as a new range of optical tags that will allow certain tasks—folding blankets, for instance, or setting the dinner table—to be accomplished much easier by machines.

An example above: mugs adapted for robot-grip.
(via BLDGBLOG: The New Robot Domesticity)

Diego Trujillo-Pisanty, currently a student in the Design Interactions department at the Royal College of Art in London, has looked ahead at how future homes might be redesigned to accommodate domestic robots. Rather than build entire new forms of architecture, however, Diego suggests that we’ll first begin quite simply: retrofitting our interior environments, in often deceptively small ways, for optical navigation by autonomous mobile home systems.

This will primarily take the form of peripheral additions to everyday objects, as well as a new range of optical tags that will allow certain tasks—folding blankets, for instance, or setting the dinner table—to be accomplished much easier by machines.

An example above: mugs adapted for robot-grip.

(via BLDGBLOG: The New Robot Domesticity)

Brainscans in the Uncanny Valley - Boing Boing

According to their interpretation of the fMRI results, the researchers say they saw, in essence, evidence of mismatch. The brain “lit up” when the human-like appearance of the android and its robotic motion “didn’t compute.”

“The brain doesn’t seem tuned to care about either biological appearance or biological motion per se,” said Saygin, an assistant professor of cognitive science at UC San Diego and alumna of the same department. “What it seems to be doing is looking for its expectations to be met – for appearance and motion to be congruent.”

Video: Three Lifelike Humanoids Sit Down For a Chat With Their Human Counterparts | Popular Science

Actually the robots say very little. However, they are quite creepy.

Social Robots Raise Moral, Ethical Questions

Prof. TURKLE: …  I’m unabashedly species chauvinistic because a robot can pretend when it says I love you, but it doesn’t know what it is to have desire or sexual life, appetites. It doesn’t have the ark of the human life.

SHAPIRO: But the people you mentioned in your research say whether it has those things or not it does a better job than the people who do.

Prof. TURKLE: Yes. People are starting to say that the simulation of feeling, the simulation of love, I might take that. I see that movement in the interviews that I do

A new robot can tell when it’s being ignored, and it politely and subtly gets a person’s attention. Researchers say the new computer vision system could help robots and humans interact more effectively, by allowing robots to use the same social cues as people.

Best part of the video is when Simon (the robot), being ignored, wanly waves at the human.

Video: Simon the Robot Can Tell When It’s Being Ignored, And Try To Get Your Attention | Popular Science

A meat-eating clock! It’s powered by dead flies.

"This carnivorous clock ("8 dead flies makes it work for about 12 days," says co-designer Professor Chris Melhuish, of Bristol Robotics) is just a prototype. It doesn’t catch enough flies to power the motor on top and the digital clock. But this is just a first step." 

Meat-Eating Furniture : Krulwich Wonders… : NPR

thingsmagazine:

Roomba Art

"New Scientist has the story of Rowan University students Zachary Grady and Joe Ridgeway and their astonishing Rubik’s-cube-solving robot, seen in the video above. Two things strike me: the robot’s singular purpose, and its radical decomposition of the gestures we befingered human beings use to play with the puzzle."

We Must Imagine This Robot Is Happy – GEARFUSE