Posts tagged Street Art

inlovewiththeflow:

hiphopisvintage:

My favorite picture/piece of artwork by far.

I love this so damn much

junkculture:

Street Eraser: Erasing the Streets with Photoshop Erasing Tool

pizzaandpixels:

Its so funny to see that by adding eyes and teeth to an object it instantly gives them so much character. I honestly had the best time making these. 

Again, you can find more of my work on my Facebook street art page:

https://www.facebook.com/AidenGlynnstreetart

(via STREET ART UTOPIA » We declare the world as our canvasYarn Bombing / Guerrilla Crochet - A Collection » STREET ART UTOPIA)
(via STREET ART UTOPIA » We declare the world as our canvasStreet Art by French artist Oakoak - A Collection 1 » STREET ART UTOPIA)
wtbw:

(via Acid Picdump (125 pics))
(via 1 | Disney Princesses Turn Deadly In This Killer Interactive Street Art | Co.Create: Creativity \ Culture \ Commerce)

nevver:

Denmark

Vandalog passes along photographer Henrik Haven’s explanation of this mural by Escif, created in connection with a public arts project:

-The organizers: “Hello, we are working on a public art project here in Horsens, so we are looking for some walls to intervene. A selected group of international artists will arrive in town to create public works on various locations in the end of June.”

-The owner of the building: “Sounds really interesting. The Turkish pizzeria that just opened in the adjacent premises is not the most beautiful image for my building… you know! So I´m sure that some nice renowned artists can equilibrate this.”

-The organizers: “Sounds good, sir!”

Rick Poynor: The Incidental Pleasures of Street Art: Observatory: Design Observer

Yesterday I tagged along with Lorna, from Knits For Life (my sister!) while she installed this super awesome iphone yarn bomb on this sad looking pay phone. As you can see in the before above, the receiver is gone so this is a definite upgrade. I wanted to ask her a few questions about the idea and her process

Read it here: The Dapper Toad: iPayPhone Yarn Bomb)
I really like this, and have just lately been thinking about abandoned pay phones and booths. Who owns them, exactly? 
Anyway this is a cool project. Via No Expectations.

Yesterday I tagged along with Lorna, from Knits For Life (my sister!) while she installed this super awesome iphone yarn bomb on this sad looking pay phone. As you can see in the before above, the receiver is gone so this is a definite upgrade. I wanted to ask her a few questions about the idea and her process

Read it here: The Dapper Toad: iPayPhone Yarn Bomb)

I really like this, and have just lately been thinking about abandoned pay phones and booths. Who owns them, exactly?

Anyway this is a cool project. Via No Expectations.


Who cares about bad graffiti or street art? The spray paint scrawls of ill-chosen tag names (“Piggy Nasty,” “Pony Tail,” “Tricky Trout, Jr.”), reckless vulgarity (penises and boobs drawn on absolutely everything), and sad drawings that barely shape into the animal, face, or whatever they’re trying to be, who cares about all that? Usually these aerosol-on-concrete creations just fade into our visual background without a second glance, but artist Scott Hocking has recognized them for the masterpieces of mediocrity that they are in a photography book appropriately called Bad Graffiti, released in December 2012 by Black Dog Publishing.

 (via An Appreciation for the Often Hilarious, Usually Horrible, World of Bad Graffiti)

Who cares about bad graffiti or street art? The spray paint scrawls of ill-chosen tag names (“Piggy Nasty,” “Pony Tail,” “Tricky Trout, Jr.”), reckless vulgarity (penises and boobs drawn on absolutely everything), and sad drawings that barely shape into the animal, face, or whatever they’re trying to be, who cares about all that? Usually these aerosol-on-concrete creations just fade into our visual background without a second glance, but artist Scott Hocking has recognized them for the masterpieces of mediocrity that they are in a photography book appropriately called Bad Graffiti, released in December 2012 by Black Dog Publishing.

 (via An Appreciation for the Often Hilarious, Usually Horrible, World of Bad Graffiti)

junkculture:

8-Bit Pigeons

The likes of Katsu, Kidult, Blu, Insa and Lush are some of the artists turning street art on its head by adding a digital dimension to their work. These artists are not only documenting their process, but rejecting the commercial direction of the medium and using the internet to ensure their works are seen by millions—in the process establishing a new definition of street art, one whose sole intention is to be consumed by online audiences.

 (via How Graffiti Artists Are Journeying From The Streets To The Computer Screen | The Creators Project)

The likes of Katsu, Kidult, Blu, Insa and Lush are some of the artists turning street art on its head by adding a digital dimension to their work. These artists are not only documenting their process, but rejecting the commercial direction of the medium and using the internet to ensure their works are seen by millions—in the process establishing a new definition of street art, one whose sole intention is to be consumed by online audiences.

 (via How Graffiti Artists Are Journeying From The Streets To The Computer Screen | The Creators Project)

Video: Kidult - Visual Dictatorship | HUH

I’m really interested in Kidult. The rhetoric is rather juvenile, but strikes me as sincere. And some of the results are pretty thrilling. This is a rare street artist today who is a full-throated advocate of vandalism — that is, he has said that if graffiti were legalized, he wouldn’t do it — and who vows never to work for brands.

Absurdly bombastic on one level, but at the same time I find it fascinating. Sort of a cross between CAP (fromStyle Wars), Anonymous, and Adbusters?