Posts tagged Symbols


Julian Burford, a Netherlands-based graphic designer, has turned eight different modern day food products and turned them into square iPhone app icons. Despite having to meet Apple’s icon guidelines, Burford has managed to keep the foods looking 3D and has kept a nice uniform style throughout.

via HUH. - Food iPhone App Icons

Julian Burford, a Netherlands-based graphic designer, has turned eight different modern day food products and turned them into square iPhone app icons. Despite having to meet Apple’s icon guidelines, Burford has managed to keep the foods looking 3D and has kept a nice uniform style throughout.

via HUH. - Food iPhone App Icons


The spinning rainbow circle informing a Mac user that his or her device is working on a problem, mild or severe, is sometimes informally referred to as the “pinwheel of death.” It’s a bit of a stealth icon: A symbol that’s become almost as recognizable and meaningful as a logo, even though it wasn’t really designed to take on that role. It’s not quite at the Fail Whale level of emblem-of-not-working. But I’m sure that Apple would just as soon not see the thing become so familiar that it can serve as the basis of a comedy bit at TED… 

Continued here: Rob Walker: Stealth Iconography: Pinwheel of Death: Observers Room: Design Observer

The spinning rainbow circle informing a Mac user that his or her device is working on a problem, mild or severe, is sometimes informally referred to as the “pinwheel of death.” It’s a bit of a stealth icon: A symbol that’s become almost as recognizable and meaningful as a logo, even though it wasn’t really designed to take on that role. It’s not quite at the Fail Whale level of emblem-of-not-working. But I’m sure that Apple would just as soon not see the thing become so familiar that it can serve as the basis of a comedy bit at TED…

Continued here: Rob Walker: Stealth Iconography: Pinwheel of Death: Observers Room: Design Observer

ilovecharts:

Did Stone Age cavemen talk to each other in symbols?
via Kurt White

As new generations discover the band and its still relevant critiques, the symbol has been emblazoned on school bags and clothing and tattooed on bodies. Many “homages” have been made over the years, some the enjoyable work of genuine fans, others just blatant, barely altered rip-offs.
Consider the current case of London fashion house Hardware. Taking the original symbol, wrapping it with a chain and adding their name, they then copyrighted the symbol to use on clothing they say is “chic, glam and borderline trashy”. They may have crossed that border with their “Whorewear” line.
You can now see an exhibit of original designs for what became the Crass Symbol, plus early variations and contemporary “re-mixes”, at the zine store and gallery Goteblüd in San Francisco. 

Free the Crass Symbol!!! By the designer of the Crass Symbol, Dave King - Boing Boing

As new generations discover the band and its still relevant critiques, the symbol has been emblazoned on school bags and clothing and tattooed on bodies. Many “homages” have been made over the years, some the enjoyable work of genuine fans, others just blatant, barely altered rip-offs.

Consider the current case of London fashion house Hardware. Taking the original symbol, wrapping it with a chain and adding their name, they then copyrighted the symbol to use on clothing they say is “chic, glam and borderline trashy”. They may have crossed that border with their “Whorewear” line.

You can now see an exhibit of original designs for what became the Crass Symbol, plus early variations and contemporary “re-mixes”, at the zine store and gallery Goteblüd in San Francisco. 

Free the Crass Symbol!!! By the designer of the Crass Symbol, Dave King - Boing Boing


What if employers didn’t care whether applicants held a college diploma but instead asked what educational “badges” they had collected?
Like Boy Scout merit badges for professionals, these marks of achievement would show competence in specific skills, and they could be granted by any number of institutions. This is the vision of a growing number of education reformers who feel that the standard certification system no longer works in today’s fast-changing job market.
The Mozilla Foundation, the group that develops the popular Firefox Web browser, is designing a framework to let anyone with a Web page—colleges, companies, even individuals—issue forgery-proof digital badges that will give potential employers details about an applicant’s training at the click of a mouse. In September, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced a $2 million grant program, run in coordination with Mozilla, to encourage organizations to try the badge system.
More than 300 groups have applied. 

Merit Badges for the Job Market - WSJ.com

What if employers didn’t care whether applicants held a college diploma but instead asked what educational “badges” they had collected?

Like Boy Scout merit badges for professionals, these marks of achievement would show competence in specific skills, and they could be granted by any number of institutions. This is the vision of a growing number of education reformers who feel that the standard certification system no longer works in today’s fast-changing job market.

The Mozilla Foundation, the group that develops the popular Firefox Web browser, is designing a framework to let anyone with a Web page—colleges, companies, even individuals—issue forgery-proof digital badges that will give potential employers details about an applicant’s training at the click of a mouse. In September, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced a $2 million grant program, run in coordination with Mozilla, to encourage organizations to try the badge system.

More than 300 groups have applied. 

Merit Badges for the Job Market - WSJ.com


From an 1890 edition of the Szarvas és vidéke, a weekly Hungarian newspaper, an explanation of the “stamp code” used to signal one’s intention when sending mash notes and such through the Emperor’s post.

(via Stamp semaphore as early emoticons - Boing Boing)

From an 1890 edition of the Szarvas és vidéke, a weekly Hungarian newspaper, an explanation of the “stamp code” used to signal one’s intention when sending mash notes and such through the Emperor’s post.

(via Stamp semaphore as early emoticons - Boing Boing)


Recently, Chengdu police made public 17 types of “casing markers/symbols”. “×” represents “plan operation”, ◇ represents “no one lives here”, a wavy line represents “beware of fierce dog”, while a rectangle with slashes represents “already thieved”.

Further details: 17 Secret Codes & Symbols Used By Chinese Thieves & Burglars – chinaSMACK.  Via Etsy Blog

Recently, Chengdu police made public 17 types of “casing markers/symbols”. “×” represents “plan operation”, ◇ represents “no one lives here”, a wavy line represents “beware of fierce dog”, while a rectangle with slashes represents “already thieved”.

Further details: 17 Secret Codes & Symbols Used By Chinese Thieves & Burglars – chinaSMACK.  Via Etsy Blog


Symbols are used by individual candidates in the Egyptian elections because of the low literacy rates in some areas and the multitude of contenders. Voters can identify their favoured candidates by symbol. 

Egyptian election: the symbols used on polling papers and posters – in pictures | World news | guardian.co.uk

Symbols are used by individual candidates in the Egyptian elections because of the low literacy rates in some areas and the multitude of contenders. Voters can identify their favoured candidates by symbol. 

Egyptian election: the symbols used on polling papers and posters – in pictures | World news | guardian.co.uk

(via The Sketches That Became Our Familiar Computer Icons - Rebecca J. Rosen - Technology - The Atlantic)
Susan Kare’s work comes up in this earlier Slate bit on Foursquare iconography.

(via The Sketches That Became Our Familiar Computer Icons - Rebecca J. Rosen - Technology - The Atlantic)

Susan Kare’s work comes up in this earlier Slate bit on Foursquare iconography.


The Japanese counterpart to the European coat of arms is the mon, also called kamon as relating to specific families. Several design elements distinguish mon from the coat of arms: The former are typically contained within a circle, tend to have axial or rotational symmetry, and rely more on abstract geometric shapes than realistic reproductions of real-world items.

(via Early Graphic Design: The Japanese Mon - Core77)

The Japanese counterpart to the European coat of arms is the mon, also called kamon as relating to specific families. Several design elements distinguish mon from the coat of arms: The former are typically contained within a circle, tend to have axial or rotational symmetry, and rely more on abstract geometric shapes than realistic reproductions of real-world items.

(via Early Graphic Design: The Japanese Mon - Core77)


A Coat of Arms, also referred to (with varying degrees of accuracy) as a blazon, a family crest or heraldic design, is a neat example of an early design solution to a pressing problem of the time.
The problem was that in the 1100s, European feudal lords doing battle with one another needed a way to visually distinguish their troops on the field. Watch a scene from Braveheart, or imagine the Rams and the Patriots going at it while wearing their street clothes, and you get an idea of what chaos pre-graphic-design battle must have been.
The solution was to paint shields and banners with graphic patterns unique to the house that bore them. I always wondered if the development of these patterns were cooked up in-house or outsourced to a local artisan, in an early example of a graphic design consultancy; if the latter, I’d have loved to sit in on that meeting.

(via Early Graphic Design: The European Coat of Arms - Core77)

A Coat of Arms, also referred to (with varying degrees of accuracy) as a blazon, a family crest or heraldic design, is a neat example of an early design solution to a pressing problem of the time.

The problem was that in the 1100s, European feudal lords doing battle with one another needed a way to visually distinguish their troops on the field. Watch a scene from Braveheart, or imagine the Rams and the Patriots going at it while wearing their street clothes, and you get an idea of what chaos pre-graphic-design battle must have been.

The solution was to paint shields and banners with graphic patterns unique to the house that bore them. I always wondered if the development of these patterns were cooked up in-house or outsourced to a local artisan, in an early example of a graphic design consultancy; if the latter, I’d have loved to sit in on that meeting.

(via Early Graphic Design: The European Coat of Arms - Core77)

drawnblog:

As I’ll be visiting Buenos Aires later this winter, I’ve been reading up on all things Argentinian (including re-watching The Motorcycle Diaries), so I was tickled when I stumbled upon this icon set of the iconic Che Guevara, designed by Jorge Alderete for an Argentinian type foundry named Sudtipos (who also created a lovely Calgary-inspired font named Calgary Script!).
(via SL Che - MyFonts)

drawnblog:

As I’ll be visiting Buenos Aires later this winter, I’ve been reading up on all things Argentinian (including re-watching The Motorcycle Diaries), so I was tickled when I stumbled upon this icon set of the iconic Che Guevara, designed by Jorge Alderete for an Argentinian type foundry named Sudtipos (who also created a lovely Calgary-inspired font named Calgary Script!).

(via SL Che - MyFonts)

nevver:

Designing the “broken image” icon
slavin:

“The logos for various brands of heroin are stamped on the wall of a Bronx heroin mill.” (via Factory-like mills feed NYC heroin market )

slavin:

The logos for various brands of heroin are stamped on the wall of a Bronx heroin mill.” (via Factory-like mills feed NYC heroin market )

lettersfromhere:


On September 10th, a group of about forty-five students, design  professionals and bloggers gathered at the School of Visual Arts in NYC  for an “Iconathon,” a  collaborative design charrette aimed at creating a set of graphic  symbols that can be applied across sectors to communicate commonly  recognized urban concepts. The event was organized by Code for America [for more about Code for America, revisit our feature about the program. -Ed.] in partnership with The Noun Project,  a group dedicated to contributing to and disseminating the world’s  collection of visual symbols. Each Iconathon event, held in cities  across the country, has its own civic theme. The theme was “311″ in San Francisco, “Food and Nutrition” in Los Angeles, “Democracy” in Chicago, “Neighborhoods” in Seattle and “Education” in Boston. In New York, the event series closed out with a focus on designing icons for “Transportation.”

(via Urban Omnibus » Iconathon: Designing Symbols for Civic Ideas)

lettersfromhere:

On September 10th, a group of about forty-five students, design professionals and bloggers gathered at the School of Visual Arts in NYC for an “Iconathon,” a collaborative design charrette aimed at creating a set of graphic symbols that can be applied across sectors to communicate commonly recognized urban concepts. The event was organized by Code for America [for more about Code for America, revisit our feature about the program. -Ed.] in partnership with The Noun Project, a group dedicated to contributing to and disseminating the world’s collection of visual symbols. Each Iconathon event, held in cities across the country, has its own civic theme. The theme was “311″ in San Francisco, “Food and Nutrition” in Los Angeles, “Democracy” in Chicago, “Neighborhoods” in Seattle and “Education” in Boston. In New York, the event series closed out with a focus on designing icons for “Transportation.”

(via Urban Omnibus » Iconathon: Designing Symbols for Civic Ideas)