Posts tagged Voyeurism


Mariken Wessel’s stunning book, Elisabeth - I want to eat. (2010, Alauda Publications), is a tour inside the mind - relentless and dark, heart wrenching, beautiful and complex.
Made with a box of found photographs from a shop in Amsterdam and put together with sophistication and maturity, a lesson is here. “Material” is out there in the world to be used, one can go inside or outside, the possibilities now are endless.
A “world” can be created out of a box, limits are not really present… if they are, the only limit is you.

I have some rather serious problems with that “analysis.” What does it mean to say “material … out there in the world” here … and how would the answer change if it involved “found” photographs of, let’s say, a relative of yours? Or of you?
But … interesting.
MARIKEN WESSELS: “Elisabeth - I Want to Eat.” (2010)

Mariken Wessel’s stunning book, Elisabeth - I want to eat. (2010, Alauda Publications), is a tour inside the mind - relentless and dark, heart wrenching, beautiful and complex.

Made with a box of found photographs from a shop in Amsterdam and put together with sophistication and maturity, a lesson is here. “Material” is out there in the world to be used, one can go inside or outside, the possibilities now are endless.

A “world” can be created out of a box, limits are not really present… if they are, the only limit is you.

I have some rather serious problems with that “analysis.” What does it mean to say “material … out there in the world” here … and how would the answer change if it involved “found” photographs of, let’s say, a relative of yours? Or of you?

But … interesting.

MARIKEN WESSELS: “Elisabeth - I Want to Eat.” (2010)

Paul Lukas has a typically thoughtful post on the subject of found photographs, and voyeurism.
Mr. Lukas, who is currently running a fantastic project called Permanent Record: Untold Stories from a Stash of Depression-Era Postcards, reacts here to an NYT piece about a different project that involves old mug shots.

What Finke was referring to there, whether she realized it or not, was voyeurism — the cheap thrill of getting a peek into someone else’s private affairs, the tingle we get from the public airing of something private, and the potential for shame if we’re caught looking. Voyeurism is a very specific term, because it indicts the viewer in some sense of culpability or responsibility, and it’s at the heart of what most of us find appealing about found objects.

The NYT piece failed to note the voyeurism factor, but it strikes me as dead-on correct that it’s crucial in considering the attraction to “found” photographs, whether in this mug-shot project, or in Lukas’s. Read his full post here: PERMANENT RECORD

Paul Lukas has a typically thoughtful post on the subject of found photographs, and voyeurism.

Mr. Lukas, who is currently running a fantastic project called Permanent Record: Untold Stories from a Stash of Depression-Era Postcards, reacts here to an NYT piece about a different project that involves old mug shots.

What Finke was referring to there, whether she realized it or not, was voyeurism — the cheap thrill of getting a peek into someone else’s private affairs, the tingle we get from the public airing of something private, and the potential for shame if we’re caught looking. Voyeurism is a very specific term, because it indicts the viewer in some sense of culpability or responsibility, and it’s at the heart of what most of us find appealing about found objects.

The NYT piece failed to note the voyeurism factor, but it strikes me as dead-on correct that it’s crucial in considering the attraction to “found” photographs, whether in this mug-shot project, or in Lukas’s. Read his full post here: PERMANENT RECORD