Posts tagged art

thejogging:

Elon Musk acquires largest air dancer manufacturer, rolls out his plans to expand at ted conference, proposes one in every front yard by 2015 (ideas worth spreading), 2013
jpegƒƒƒƒƒ

thejogging:

Elon Musk acquires largest air dancer manufacturer, rolls out his plans to expand at ted conference, proposes one in every front yard by 2015 (ideas worth spreading), 2013

jpeg

ƒƒƒƒƒ

Striving to Make Your Mail Relevant One Postcard at a Time

artisanalpostcards:

Nominate your friends and loved ones for future art mailings by clicking SUBMIT AN ADDRESS.

We thank-you for your interest in art and the postal system - and for following this blog - and being, in general, your fabulous self! Rock on.

http://artisanalpostcards.tumblr.com/email

I got one. They’re cool.


His superthin tripod does seem to have attracted the attention of the mom on the left, but no one else. They’re looking at each other as he shoots. His blue T-shirt says elgooG.

(via greg.org: the making of: movies, art, &c., by greg allen)

His superthin tripod does seem to have attracted the attention of the mom on the left, but no one else. They’re looking at each other as he shoots. His blue T-shirt says elgooG.

(via greg.org: the making of: movies, art, &c., by greg allen)

(via Carlos Jiménez Cahua | i like this art)
Cheryl Pope. #Yell_Yell, 2013; Plastic, steel, aluminum, auto paint. 69 x 54 x 27 in. moniquemeloche, Chicago; Photo: James Prinz (via DAILY SERVING » Just Yell at Monique Meloche Gallery)

Cheryl Pope. #Yell_Yell, 2013; Plastic, steel, aluminum, auto paint. 69 x 54 x 27 in. moniquemeloche, Chicago; Photo: James Prinz (via DAILY SERVING » Just Yell at Monique Meloche Gallery)

From a post today rounding up a whole bunch of art/design/hacker projects that draw from and (mis)use Google’s various visual tools

Above: Phil Thompson’s Copyrights actually draws on Google’s more official interaction with the art world: The Google Art Project, which documents various museums so they can be explored from afar via a Street View-like interface. But evidently there are “copyright issues” around certain images in certain museums. Thompson seeks those out and captures them with screenshots — then he has the pixelated abstraction copied in the form of an oil painting (by companies that offer this service in China; who knew?). Thus a blocked digital image is converted back into a physical art work.

Check out the whole roundup here: The Googleheim Museum of Art - Yahoo! News

From a post today rounding up a whole bunch of art/design/hacker projects that draw from and (mis)use Google’s various visual tools

Above: Phil Thompson’s Copyrights actually draws on Google’s more official interaction with the art world: The Google Art Project, which documents various museums so they can be explored from afar via a Street View-like interface. But evidently there are “copyright issues” around certain images in certain museums. Thompson seeks those out and captures them with screenshots — then he has the pixelated abstraction copied in the form of an oil painting (by companies that offer this service in China; who knew?). Thus a blocked digital image is converted back into a physical art work.

Check out the whole roundup here: The Googleheim Museum of Art - Yahoo! News


Enough
2011
Book .5”x7”x7”
I use a default template as the final product.

(via Jesse Eric Schmidt - Enough)
Who is this guy? His portfolio is worth checking out.

Enough

2011

Book .5”x7”x7”

I use a default template as the final product.

(via Jesse Eric Schmidt - Enough)

Who is this guy? His portfolio is worth checking out.

thejogging:

any idea what they call it when someone unintentionally makes art that mimics or references other well known art? (Safeway sign converted into a Rothko painting), 2013
Digital photo
?

thejogging:

any idea what they call it when someone unintentionally makes art that mimics or references other well known art? (Safeway sign converted into a Rothko painting), 2013

Digital photo

?


It was a postcard — but not the mass-printed variety. A collage incorporating multiple materials, the object included a Web address, artisinalpostcards.tumblr.com. The typewritten note said I was “receiving this from the Random Acts of Mail Art project.” While I wasn’t expected to do anything as a result, I was invited to pass along snail-mail addresses of anybody else who might like to get such a card. Elsewhere it said: “ARTISANAL POSTCARD #289.”
I was interested. Obviously mail art has a long and rich history (I can remember participating in at least one mail project back in my college years). But here I was curious about the decision to tie this analog and personal form to a regularly updated blog, which functioned both to publicize and extend the project. I also liked the actual work — both my physical card, and the many digital reproductions on the Tumblr. There wasn’t much information on the site at the time, but when I checked again more recently some detail had been added, and I got in touch with the project’s creator, Jill Stoll.

Continued: Jill Stoll combines artistic ritual, creative reuse, and the postal service as connector.: Observatory: Design Observer

It was a postcard — but not the mass-printed variety. A collage incorporating multiple materials, the object included a Web address, artisinalpostcards.tumblr.com. The typewritten note said I was “receiving this from the Random Acts of Mail Art project.” While I wasn’t expected to do anything as a result, I was invited to pass along snail-mail addresses of anybody else who might like to get such a card. Elsewhere it said: “ARTISANAL POSTCARD #289.”

I was interested. Obviously mail art has a long and rich history (I can remember participating in at least one mail project back in my college years). But here I was curious about the decision to tie this analog and personal form to a regularly updated blog, which functioned both to publicize and extend the project. I also liked the actual work — both my physical card, and the many digital reproductions on the Tumblr. There wasn’t much information on the site at the time, but when I checked again more recently some detail had been added, and I got in touch with the project’s creator, Jill Stoll.

Continued: Jill Stoll combines artistic ritual, creative reuse, and the postal service as connector.: Observatory: Design Observer


British artist Tomas Georgeson wants people to visit Milton Keynes Gallery in the UK, so he’s hidden a blank check for £8,000 ($12,600) in the art gallery.
Visitors have until March 1st to find the check before it is removed. Georgeson hopes that the hunt for the check will raise local interest and increase visitor numbers, and he has placed an advert in a local paper to inform the residents.

(via Artist Hides 8,000 Pound Check In Gallery To Increase Visitor Numbers - PSFK)

British artist Tomas Georgeson wants people to visit Milton Keynes Gallery in the UK, so he’s hidden a blank check for £8,000 ($12,600) in the art gallery.

Visitors have until March 1st to find the check before it is removed. Georgeson hopes that the hunt for the check will raise local interest and increase visitor numbers, and he has placed an advert in a local paper to inform the residents.

(via Artist Hides 8,000 Pound Check In Gallery To Increase Visitor Numbers - PSFK)

Man Bartlett, “Where a chair was present” (2010), mixed-media collage, 5 x 7 inches

On eBay right now, you can buy a piece of tape used to mark the position of the visitors’ chair from Marina Abramović’s epic 2010 performance at the Museum of Modern Art. That might strike you as a fairly minute and extreme bit of fan ephemera, which it may very well be. But it’s also an artwork by Man Bartlett.
“Where a chair was present” (clever! Abramović’s show was called The Artist Is Present) is actually the title of the work being sold, and technically it’s a collage, albeit one that Bartlett made by sticking the spike tape on a piece of paper and signing the back. “It’s somewhere in between appropriation and shenanigans,” he told Hyperallergic. It might also be somewhere between hero worship and art — or maybe it’s tribute art, like Shepherd Fairey’s Obama “Hope” poster, minus the political aim.

 More: Get a Piece of Marina Abramović

Man Bartlett, “Where a chair was present” (2010), mixed-media collage, 5 x 7 inches

On eBay right now, you can buy a piece of tape used to mark the position of the visitors’ chair from Marina Abramović’s epic 2010 performance at the Museum of Modern Art. That might strike you as a fairly minute and extreme bit of fan ephemera, which it may very well be. But it’s also an artwork by Man Bartlett.

“Where a chair was present” (clever! Abramović’s show was called The Artist Is Present) is actually the title of the work being sold, and technically it’s a collage, albeit one that Bartlett made by sticking the spike tape on a piece of paper and signing the back. “It’s somewhere in between appropriation and shenanigans,” he told Hyperallergic. It might also be somewhere between hero worship and art — or maybe it’s tribute art, like Shepherd Fairey’s Obama “Hope” poster, minus the political aim.

 More: Get a Piece of Marina Abramović

I really love Ronit Baranga's work.


Untitled Project: GIFT CARD [$500],
oil on carved wood,
4 3/4 x 6 1/4 x 1/4 inches, 2012

(via Untitled Project: GIFT SHOP — Untitled Project: GIFT CARD [$500])
Speaking of gifts … new from Conrad Bakker.

Untitled Project: GIFT CARD [$500],

oil on carved wood,

4 3/4 x 6 1/4 x 1/4 inches, 2012

(via Untitled Project: GIFT SHOP — Untitled Project: GIFT CARD [$500])

Speaking of gifts … new from Conrad Bakker.

junkculture:

Artist Robert Wechsler creates amazing sculptural cubes by joining pennies in perfect orientation to one another…more

junkculture:

Artist Robert Wechsler creates amazing sculptural cubes by joining pennies in perfect orientation to one another…more


New York City gallery W/—— ‘s Disposable Cameras project, on display at the NADA art fair in Miami through this weekend: If you visit W/——’s booth at the fair, you’ll find a wall of 24 hanging disposable cameras, each with a very hefty price tag. Each of the 24 cameras was given to a photographer/artist to do with as they pleased. The cameras were then returned by the artists to W/—— in time for this art show. The cameras, filled with the undeveloped and therefore un-viewable work of their temporary owners, are now on sale for $1,000 a piece to optimistic patrons browsing NADA.

I like that a lot. [More: Disposable Cameras Exposed by Artists On Sale for $1,000 Each — Undeveloped] There is also an interview with W/——’s Jiminie Ha on Coolhunting, partly focused on White Zinfandel, magazine/food/event project. That Q&A includes this: 
What’s Next for White Zinfandel?



Ha: We are starting to commission artists to work with everyday objects and re-appropriate them to create functioning art.

Obviously I’m extremely interested in that.

New York City gallery W/—— ‘s Disposable Cameras project, on display at the NADA art fair in Miami through this weekend: If you visit W/——’s booth at the fair, you’ll find a wall of 24 hanging disposable cameras, each with a very hefty price tag.

Each of the 24 cameras was given to a photographer/artist to do with as they pleased. The cameras were then returned by the artists to W/—— in time for this art show. The cameras, filled with the undeveloped and therefore un-viewable work of their temporary owners, are now on sale for $1,000 a piece to optimistic patrons browsing NADA.

I like that a lot. [More: Disposable Cameras Exposed by Artists On Sale for $1,000 Each — Undeveloped] There is also an interview with W/——’s Jiminie Ha on Coolhunting, partly focused on White Zinfandel, magazine/food/event project. That Q&A includes this:
What’s Next for White Zinfandel?
Ha: We are starting to commission artists to work with everyday objects and re-appropriate them to create functioning art.
Obviously I’m extremely interested in that.