Posts tagged narrative

Third Coast International Audio Festival :: Re:sound #144 The Letters Show

Something Lost, Something Found by Samara Freemark (Unfictional, KCRW, 2011) We put a lot of trust in the US Postal Service and for the most part, it comes through for us. But when one company handles approximately 177 billion pieces of mail a year, every once in awhile a few things are bound to get lost.

This story explores the place where lost mail goes to be found - though not necessarily by its proper owner.

Great segment.

Ask any publisher whether they would rather have the Proust and Joyce backlists or those of the Nora Roberts and Tom Clancy of Proust’s and Joyce’s day. Really good stories, like really good wines, really do drink well for a longer time

In a show opening in London, the contents of women’s handbags – crumpled receipts, the roll-up tobacco, shoes – are spilled out into glass cases. But isn’t it intrusive, displaying such personal items in a public art gallery for all the world to see? “Oh God, of course,” said gallery director Julia Peyton-Jones cheerfully. “But it’s fascinating isn’t it?” Hans-Peter Feldmann Serpentine gallery, London W2 3XA Starts 11 April Until 5 June Details: 020 7402 6075 Venue website The six bags and their contents are new works by the German artist Hans-Peter Feldmann at the Serpentine gallery as part of a major retrospective of his work from the past 40 year. 

There’s definitely an “art is anything you can get away with” quality to this — similar imagery has flooded Flickr for years and years. (Hey, remember Flickr?) And there are many blogs/Tumblrs collecting such things.
Even so, there’s just enough gloss added here to make this worth … linking to?
(via A handbag? Surely you’re joking, Mr Feldmann … | Art and design | The Guardian)

In a show opening in London, the contents of women’s handbags – crumpled receipts, the roll-up tobacco, shoes – are spilled out into glass cases. But isn’t it intrusive, displaying such personal items in a public art gallery for all the world to see? “Oh God, of course,” said gallery director Julia Peyton-Jones cheerfully. “But it’s fascinating isn’t it?” Hans-Peter Feldmann Serpentine gallery, London W2 3XA Starts 11 April Until 5 June Details: 020 7402 6075 Venue website The six bags and their contents are new works by the German artist Hans-Peter Feldmann at the Serpentine gallery as part of a major retrospective of his work from the past 40 year. 

There’s definitely an “art is anything you can get away with” quality to this — similar imagery has flooded Flickr for years and years. (Hey, remember Flickr?) And there are many blogs/Tumblrs collecting such things.

Even so, there’s just enough gloss added here to make this worth … linking to?

(via A handbag? Surely you’re joking, Mr Feldmann … | Art and design | The Guardian)

(via Destroyed Apple Products | thaeger - blog this way)
This item, via @Osulop, arrives at a moment when I’ve been thinking about destruction — like videos of buildings being destroyed and that sort of thing. Isn’t destruction a form of object narrative? That’s sort of underrated?
Anyway, lots of good examples of destroyed Apple products if you click through. But this one, for me, stood out.

(via Destroyed Apple Products | thaeger - blog this way)

This item, via @Osulop, arrives at a moment when I’ve been thinking about destruction — like videos of buildings being destroyed and that sort of thing. Isn’t destruction a form of object narrative? That’s sort of underrated?

Anyway, lots of good examples of destroyed Apple products if you click through. But this one, for me, stood out.

So many, in fact all fundamentalist ideas, rest on the assumption that some things have intrinsic value and resonance and meaning. All pragmatists work from another assumption: No, it’s us. It’s us who make those meanings.
unconsumption:

In Toronto, several people who work together in a group known as “The Art of Reuse” open up pop-up thrift shops in different locations every six months or so, selling merchandise — many items one-of-a-kind — they’ve handpicked (or “curated,” as they say) from thrift stores around metro Toronto.
The group aims to “re-invent thrift shopping and the connotation it comes with, whether that be negative or positive,” by creating “well-branded, aesthetically pleasing” shopping environments with merchandise priced at $50 or less.
The temporary stores are “meant to cater to both the fashion conscious and the frugal customer alike.”
In The Globe and Mail, Katharine Scarrow reports:

“It’s never been about generating cash quickly, but raising awareness about thrifting and teaching people about sustainability,” says [group member] Courtney [Eastman].
In the six months leading up to [a store opening], the group spends four to five days a week, fanning to three to four shops a day, scouring each one for roughly an hour at a time. That’s roughly 480 hours of picking (and ultimately ditching) piles of clothes and accessories leading up to the main event.

More: In Pictures: Pop-up thrift shop draws a stylish crowd - The Globe and Mail

unconsumption:

In Toronto, several people who work together in a group known as “The Art of Reuse” open up pop-up thrift shops in different locations every six months or so, selling merchandise — many items one-of-a-kind — they’ve handpicked (or “curated,” as they say) from thrift stores around metro Toronto.

The group aims to “re-invent thrift shopping and the connotation it comes with, whether that be negative or positive,” by creating “well-branded, aesthetically pleasing” shopping environments with merchandise priced at $50 or less.

The temporary stores are “meant to cater to both the fashion conscious and the frugal customer alike.”

In The Globe and Mail, Katharine Scarrow reports:

“It’s never been about generating cash quickly, but raising awareness about thrifting and teaching people about sustainability,” says [group member] Courtney [Eastman].

In the six months leading up to [a store opening], the group spends four to five days a week, fanning to three to four shops a day, scouring each one for roughly an hour at a time. That’s roughly 480 hours of picking (and ultimately ditching) piles of clothes and accessories leading up to the main event.

More: In Pictures: Pop-up thrift shop draws a stylish crowd - The Globe and Mail


Inspired by the work of Significant Objects … and how they got that way, Grade 11 students (ELA 20-1) from Wm. E. Hay High School are embarking upon a journey of their own to see where it will lead them.
In September they chose their  “insignificant” objects and began writing stories about them to create  their significance. On Friday (Dec. 9) we began publishing the stories  along with the items on eBay to see if people will buy them because of  their newly created significance.
The students’ objects & stories: http://stettlerssignificantobjects.blogspot.com/;  their eBay store. Help ‘em spread the word.

(via Check out a high school’s Significant Objects-inspired experiment | Significant Objects)

Inspired by the work of Significant Objects … and how they got that way, Grade 11 students (ELA 20-1) from Wm. E. Hay High School are embarking upon a journey of their own to see where it will lead them.

In September they chose their “insignificant” objects and began writing stories about them to create their significance. On Friday (Dec. 9) we began publishing the stories along with the items on eBay to see if people will buy them because of their newly created significance.

The students’ objects & stories: http://stettlerssignificantobjects.blogspot.com/;  their eBay store. Help ‘em spread the word.

(via Check out a high school’s Significant Objects-inspired experiment | Significant Objects)

London-based designer and artist Thomas Forsyth recently fabricated “ten bespoke brass nuts, each weighing in at just over half a kilo. Made using ancient metal-working techinques, with a 21st Century twist. Accompanied by a short film to show the entire process.” 

Ten Brass Nuts by Thomas Forsyth for the Build Conference - Core77

This is a fascinating visual account of how something was made.

What would be nice is if there were some explanation of why these things were made. Are they simply decorative objects? Are they souvenirs of the process of making them? What?


I was thrilled to pitch in and help MoMA’s Laura Beiles organize The Language of Objects, an evening (on November 2) of speculative responses to such a richly imaginative show. We made a list of creative thinkers, writers, and storytellers, and our top four choices promptly agreed to play along: Kenneth Goldsmith, poet; Ben Greenman, author and editor, The New Yorker; Leanne Shapton, illustrator, author, and publisher; and Cintra Wilson, culture critic and novelist. In responding to Talk to Me, each has devised a wholly original creative work making its debut at our Language of Objects evening of words, images, audio, video, and, above all, imagination. 

November 2 in NYC.
More: MoMA | The Language of Objects

I was thrilled to pitch in and help MoMA’s Laura Beiles organize The Language of Objects, an evening (on November 2) of speculative responses to such a richly imaginative show. We made a list of creative thinkers, writers, and storytellers, and our top four choices promptly agreed to play along: Kenneth Goldsmith, poet; Ben Greenman, author and editor, The New Yorker; Leanne Shapton, illustrator, author, and publisher; and Cintra Wilson, culture critic and novelist. In responding to Talk to Me, each has devised a wholly original creative work making its debut at our Language of Objects evening of words, images, audio, video, and, above all, imagination. 

November 2 in NYC.

More: MoMA | The Language of Objects

(via Significant Objects)

Mariken Wessel’s stunning book, Elisabeth - I want to eat. (2010, Alauda Publications), is a tour inside the mind - relentless and dark, heart wrenching, beautiful and complex.
Made with a box of found photographs from a shop in Amsterdam and put together with sophistication and maturity, a lesson is here. “Material” is out there in the world to be used, one can go inside or outside, the possibilities now are endless.
A “world” can be created out of a box, limits are not really present… if they are, the only limit is you.

I have some rather serious problems with that “analysis.” What does it mean to say “material … out there in the world” here … and how would the answer change if it involved “found” photographs of, let’s say, a relative of yours? Or of you?
But … interesting.
MARIKEN WESSELS: “Elisabeth - I Want to Eat.” (2010)

Mariken Wessel’s stunning book, Elisabeth - I want to eat. (2010, Alauda Publications), is a tour inside the mind - relentless and dark, heart wrenching, beautiful and complex.

Made with a box of found photographs from a shop in Amsterdam and put together with sophistication and maturity, a lesson is here. “Material” is out there in the world to be used, one can go inside or outside, the possibilities now are endless.

A “world” can be created out of a box, limits are not really present… if they are, the only limit is you.

I have some rather serious problems with that “analysis.” What does it mean to say “material … out there in the world” here … and how would the answer change if it involved “found” photographs of, let’s say, a relative of yours? Or of you?

But … interesting.

MARIKEN WESSELS: “Elisabeth - I Want to Eat.” (2010)

Fuck Yeah Made in USA

Interesting idea for a Tumblr; it is (so far) all videos, showing factories, processes, etc. They appear to be company-made videos, from the couple I’ve watched. A potentially interesting resource. 


As branding experts tell it, “narrative marketing” is the best way to sell something. “Tell the product’s story,” they say, “and consumers will listen.” But whatever story the brand chooses to tell, there are other, more personal stories that consumers will also hear.
Danish painter, Jonna Pedersen, explaining her recent focus on packaging, says, “To me, the outside says something about the inside. It’s all about reading the barcode. …
"A product logo can unleash half-forgotten memories and sensations. We have all had this experience. Expressing the zeitgeist, consumer products can become cultural icons. Product graphics and packaging obviously matter. Visual impact and narrativity characterize those products that are deemed ‘classic.’”

More here: Jonna Pedersen: Product Stories & the Inner Lives of Packaging - box vox

As branding experts tell it, “narrative marketing” is the best way to sell something. “Tell the product’s story,” they say, “and consumers will listen.” But whatever story the brand chooses to tell, there are other, more personal stories that consumers will also hear.

Danish painter, Jonna Pedersen, explaining her recent focus on packaging, says, “To me, the outside says something about the inside. It’s all about reading the barcode. …

"A product logo can unleash half-forgotten memories and sensations. We have all had this experience. Expressing the zeitgeist, consumer products can become cultural icons. Product graphics and packaging obviously matter. Visual impact and narrativity characterize those products that are deemed ‘classic.’”

More here: Jonna Pedersen: Product Stories & the Inner Lives of Packaging - box vox


New York designer Kacie Kinzer, who built the cardboard Tweenbot, told Wired.com she deliberately kept the design as simple as possible. “I wanted to introduce empathetic characters on the streets of New York City,” she said in an e-mail. “This disruption created an opportunity for people to step outside of their routines and be playful, curious and engaged in an unexpected way.”

(via Talk to Me Exhibit Explores Symbiosis Between Man, Machines | Underwire | Wired.com)

New York designer Kacie Kinzer, who built the cardboard Tweenbot, told Wired.com she deliberately kept the design as simple as possible. “I wanted to introduce empathetic characters on the streets of New York City,” she said in an e-mail. “This disruption created an opportunity for people to step outside of their routines and be playful, curious and engaged in an unexpected way.”

(via Talk to Me Exhibit Explores Symbiosis Between Man, Machines | Underwire | Wired.com)


Agustina Woodgate has found a clever way to make the thrift store shopping experience even more rewarding by sneakily stitching  “Poetry Tags" onto clothing for shoppers to later discover.
I did some googling and found one of the stores in Miami where she did it. So you can go there and look for some poetically altered clothing…if you want.

More: Thrift Store Poetry Bombing @Craftzine.com blog
I really dig this idea. Maybe for Significant Objects, we should have just taped the stories to junk at Goodwill? Next time!
This is also reminds me of something I think Andrew Andrew once did — if I remember right, involved inserting their own label (“Respect Me”) in clothes at stores like the Gap.
Kind of a shop-dropping variation…
Anyway, this is cool.

Agustina Woodgate has found a clever way to make the thrift store shopping experience even more rewarding by sneakily stitching “Poetry Tags" onto clothing for shoppers to later discover.

I did some googling and found one of the stores in Miami where she did it. So you can go there and look for some poetically altered clothing…if you want.

More: Thrift Store Poetry Bombing @Craftzine.com blog

I really dig this idea. Maybe for Significant Objects, we should have just taped the stories to junk at Goodwill? Next time!

This is also reminds me of something I think Andrew Andrew once did — if I remember right, involved inserting their own label (“Respect Me”) in clothes at stores like the Gap.

Kind of a shop-dropping variation…

Anyway, this is cool.